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Charging Stations

Public Charging Station Basics

Public Charging FAQs
What are the different types of charging stations?

There are three levels of EV charging speed: Level 1, Level 2 and DC Fast Charge. The time it takes to charge your EV depends on the size of your EV’s battery, the rate of charge your vehicle can accept and the speed of the charging station.

An hour connected to a Level 1 charger (the standard US household outlet) will provide a battery electric vehicle (BEV) or plug-in hybrid electric vehicle (PHEV) with about 2-10 miles of additional range. This is best for charging overnight when your car isn’t in use, or for PHEVs which have smaller batteries and can rely on their built-in gas engines if they run out of battery.

Level 2 is considerably faster than Level 1 and is currently the most common option for public charging. An hour of Level 2 charging will add about 20-25 miles to most BEVs and PHEVs.

DC Fast Chargers (DCFC) are the fastest type of charger publicly available today. BEV drivers can expect to gain over 150 miles of range in an hour on the charger. For most BEVs, drivers can expect to get almost 80% of their total range restored in just 30 minutes. It’s important to note that PHEVs (and some older BEVs) are not compatible with DCFC stations.

Tesla Supercharging stations are most similar to the speeds of DCFC, but only Tesla cars can charge at Tesla-branded public charging stations.  See below for more on charging connector compatibility, and  Browse Electric Vehicles to learn more about specific brands and models.

How do I select a public charging station that works with my EV?

Every EV on the road today in the U.S. is compatible with one of three standard charging connectors: SAE J1772, CHAdeMO, & Tesla.

public charger outlets
right arrow bullet point

SAE J1772 is designed for Level 1 and Level 2 charging, unless equipped with the CCS Combo plug, which enables DCFC.

right arrow bullet point

CHAdeMO connectors are capable of Level 1, Level 2 or DCFC with the same universal connector.

right arrow bullet point

Tesla can charge using the proprietary Tesla Supercharger network with their car's standard Tesla connector but will need to use an adapter to charge at SAE J1772 or CHAdeMO stations.

Before you use a DC Fast Charger, learn about your EV’s connector type. Some DC Fast Charger stations support both CHAdeMO and SAE J1772 connectors. The Tesla Supercharger network is not compatible with other vehicles.

Do I have to pay for a public charger? If so, how?

Some public charging stations are free, and some require the driver to pay. The station may allow a user to swipe their credit card right at the plug or offer subscriptions that can be prepaid monthly, often through an application on the driver’s phone. Go to the links in the National Public Charging Networks table to learn more about your options.

Public charging etiquette

Most public charger users follow simple “rules of the road” to ensure that everyone has a good experience. Some best practices are:

right arrow bullet point

When you’re done charging, move your car out of the charging spot as soon as possible so others can use the charger.

right arrow bullet point

Don’t unplug other’s cars to plug yours in.

right arrow bullet point

Top off when you can, not when you have to. If you add a little charge here and there (especially when you wouldn’t be in the car anyway – such as running into the grocery store or mall), you might be able to avoid long charging stops to juice up a battery that is nearly empty.

EV Charging Speed
Level 1
all electric vehicle

BEV empty to full: ~ 44 hours

 plug in hybrid vehicle

PHEV empty to full: ~ 10 hours

Best used when car is idle for many hours.
LEAST FAST clock
5 Miles
of range added per hour charged
Level 2
all electric vehicle

BEV empty to full: ~ 10 hours

 plug in hybrid vehicle

PHEV empty to full: ~ 2 hours

Most readily available at public charging stations for adding range on the go or quickly topping off at home.
FASTER clock
20 Miles
of range added per hour charged
DC Fast Charger
all electric vehicle

BEV empty to full: ~ 1 hour

 plug in hybrid vehicle

PHEV: n/a

Fastest charging available, with growing networks of public stations.
FASTEST clock
160 Miles
of range added per hour charged
Above figures are representative of a Battery Electric Vehicle (BEV) with a 62 kW battery capacity and a Plug-in Hybrid Vehicle (PHEV) with a 14kW battery capacity. Both vehicles have an EPA Rating of 31 kWh per 100 miles.
National Public Charing Networks
Network
L2
Stations
DCFC
Stations
L2
Cost Per Charge
DCFC
Cost Per Charge
1,308
69
Mix of $/kWh and $/session, by state
10,569
814
Varies by location
93
457
$/minute, varies with power level and by state
552
37
Varies by location
orange pop out  EVgo
302
811
Flat fee - $1.50/hour
$/minute, by state
orange pop out  FLO
187
0
Flat fee - $1/hour
$10/hour
122
0
Varies by location
534
211
Varies by location
117
13
$1.25/hour - $3/hour
$5/hour - $7/hour
1,598
0
Varies by location
3,771
887
Varies by location
588
1
Free
59
56
Flat fee - $4.00/session
$7.50/session

Public Charging Station Basics

EV Charging Speed
Level 1
LEAST FAST clock
all electric vehicle

BEV empty to full: ~ 44 hours

 
plug in hybrid vehicle

PHEV empty to full: ~ 10 hours

Best used when car is idle for many hours.


5 Miles of range added per hour charged

Level 2
FASTER clock
all electric vehicle

BEV empty to full: ~ 10 hours

 
plug in hybrid vehicle

PHEV empty to full: ~ 2 hours

Most readily available at public charging stations for adding range on the go or quickly topping off at home.


20 Miles of range added per hour charged

DC Fast Charger
FASTEST clock
all electric vehicle

BEV empty to full: ~ 1 hour

 
plug in hybrid vehicle

PHEV: n/a

Fastest charging available, with growing networks of public stations.


160 Miles of range added per hour charged

Above figures are representative of a Battery Electric Vehicle (BEV) with a 62 kW battery capacity and a Plug-in Hybrid Vehicle (PHEV) with a 14kW battery capacity. Both vehicles have an EPA Rating of 31 kWh per 100 miles.
Public Charging FAQs
What are the different types of charging stations?

There are three levels of EV charging speed: Level 1, Level 2 and DC Fast Charge. The time it takes to charge your EV depends on the size of your EV’s battery, the rate of charge your vehicle can accept and the speed of the charging station.

An hour connected to a Level 1 charger (the standard US household outlet) will provide a battery electric vehicle (BEV) or plug-in hybrid electric vehicle (PHEV) with about 2-10 miles of additional range. This is best for charging overnight when your car isn’t in use, or for PHEVs which have smaller batteries and can rely on their built-in gas engines if they run out of battery.

Level 2 is considerably faster than Level 1 and is currently the most common option for public charging. An hour of Level 2 charging will add about 20-25 miles to most BEVs and PHEVs.

DC Fast Chargers (DCFC) are the fastest type of charger publicly available today. BEV drivers can expect to gain over 150 miles of range in an hour on the charger. For most BEVs, drivers can expect to get almost 80% of their total range restored in just 30 minutes. It’s important to note that PHEVs (and some older BEVs) are not compatible with DCFC stations.

Tesla Supercharging stations are most similar to the speeds of DCFC, but only Tesla cars can charge at Tesla-branded public charging stations.  See below for more on charging connector compatibility, and  Browse Electric Vehicles to learn more about specific brands and models.

How do I select a public charging station that works with my EV?

Every EV on the road today in the U.S. is compatible with one of three standard charging connectors: SAE J1772, CHAdeMO, & Tesla.

public charger outlets
right arrow bullet point

SAE J1772 is designed for Level 1 and Level 2 charging, unless equipped with the CCS Combo plug, which enables DCFC.

right arrow bullet point

CHAdeMO connectors are capable of Level 1, Level 2 or DCFC with the same universal connector.

right arrow bullet point

Tesla can charge using the proprietary Tesla Supercharger network with their car's standard Tesla connector but will need to use an adapter to charge at SAE J1772 or CHAdeMO stations.

Before you use a DC Fast Charger, learn about your EV’s connector type. Some DC Fast Charger stations support both CHAdeMO and SAE J1772 connectors. The Tesla Supercharger network is not compatible with other vehicles.

Do I have to pay for a public charger? If so, how?

Some public charging stations are free, and some require the driver to pay. The station may allow a user to swipe their credit card right at the plug or offer subscriptions that can be prepaid monthly, often through an application on the driver’s phone. Go to the links in the National Public Charging Networks table to learn more about your options.

Public charging etiquette

Most public charger users follow simple “rules of the road” to ensure that everyone has a good experience. Some best practices are:

right arrow bullet point

When you’re done charging, move your car out of the charging spot as soon as possible so others can use the charger.

right arrow bullet point

Don’t unplug other’s cars to plug yours in.

right arrow bullet point

Top off when you can, not when you have to. If you add a little charge here and there (especially when you wouldn’t be in the car anyway – such as running into the grocery store or mall), you might be able to avoid long charging stops to juice up a battery that is nearly empty.

National Public Charing Networks
NETWORK# OF STATIONS

1,377

COST PER CHARGE
L2Mix of $/kWh and $/session, by state
11,383

COST PER CHARGE
L2Varies by location
COST PER CHARGE
L2$/minute, varies with power level and by state
COST PER CHARGE
L2Varies by location
orange pop out  EVgo
1,113

COST PER CHARGE
L2Flat fee - $1.50/hour
DCFC$/minute, by state
orange pop out  FLO
187

COST PER CHARGE
L2Flat fee - $1/hour
DCFC$10/hour
COST PER CHARGE
L2Varies by location
745

COST PER CHARGE
L2Varies by location
130

COST PER CHARGE
L2$1.25/hour - $3/hour
DCFC$5/hour - $7/hour
1,598

COST PER CHARGE
L2Varies by location
4,658

COST PER CHARGE
L2Varies by location
589

COST PER CHARGE
L2Free
115

COST PER CHARGE
L2Flat fee - $4.00/session
DCFC$7.50/session

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